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Stone tools about 13,000 years old tell stories of late Pleistocene

Douglas Bamforth, Anthropology professor for the University of Colorado at Boulder places his hand on one of more than 80 artifacts unearthed about two feet below Boulder resident Patrick Mahaffy's front yard during a landscaping project in 2008.

The Museum of Natural History in Boulder, Colorado shows an exhibit of over 80 stone age items found in 2008 in a backyard in the city

The discovery of stone tools from the late Pleistocene (13,000 years ago) within the city limits of Boulder in 2008 was a rare event in archaeology. A new exhibit in the University of Colorado’s Museum of Natural History in Boulder features the collection of more than 80 of these stone tools known as The Mahaffy Cache found in a backyard.

The artifacts, which may have been made during the so called Clovis period, were neatly arranged in a cache, suggesting that the users of these instruments may have intended to reuse them.

A most fascinating topic in the exhibit is that the stones for the tools used come from distant sites – one more proof that already in the Stone Age long-distance trade relations existed.

Two knifes, one made of stone (left) and one of volcanic glass obsidian, looking like „twins“ and maybe worked by the same craftsman.

In a video are mentioned the two ancient knifes famous among archaeologists, one made of stone and one of volcanic glass obsidian, looking like „twins“ and maybe worked by the same craftsman.

The exhibit includes interactive elements and videos, as well as replicas of the tools that visitors can pick up and hold.

Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado

Press release

Video

Photos: Glenn J Asakawa / University of Colorado

Translation: pebe

Douglas Bamforth, Anthropology professor for the University of Colorado at Boulder, left, and Patrick Mahaffy, show a portion of more than 80 stone age artifacts.The map shows the likely route of the ancient tools from northeast Utah to the modern day city limits of Boulder. Image by Douglas Bamforth, Anthropology professor for the University of Colorado at Boulder.

(19.10.2015, USA: 10.19.2015)