Science: tectonic plates at the Aleutian coastline, new mineral petrovit, Mount Everest’s glaciers and microplastics, juvenile Plateosaurus’ skeleton

Shishaldin, Isanotski, and Roundtop Volcanoes lined up in a row on a rare crystal clear Aleutian day. Alaska, Aleutian Islands. Source: Allan Shimada, NOAA NMFS/OST/AMD / <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/"target="_blank">Wikimedia Commons</a>, <a href=" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons_license"target="_blank">Creative Commons License</a>
Unexpected new details about Alaska’s earthquake- and volcano-rich coast from the Aleutian Islands to the southeast and its tectonic plates revealed by researchers using new scientific tools.
https://www.umass.edu/newsoffice/article/piecing-together-alaska%E2%80%99s-fractured
 

Petrovit. Credit: SPbU
Russian Scientists discovered a new mineral, petrovit, Na10CaCu2(SO4)8, that occurs as blue globular aggregates of tabular crystals with gaseous inclusions. The find looks promising for producing batteries.
https://english.spbu.ru/news/4037-st-petersburg-university-scientists-discover-a-new-mineral-that-looks-promising-for-producing-batteries
 

View of the scientists’ tents at Camp IV/South Col. In the background, climbers make their way to the summit. Photo: Mariusz Potocki/National Geographic
Glaciers around Mt. Everest have thinned by more than 100 m since the 1960s and the rate of ice mass loss has consistently accelerated over the past six decades. Microplastics can be found as high up as 8,440 m above sea level, just below the summit.
https://www.cell.com/one-earth/fulltext/S2590-3322(20)30549-2
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oneear.2020.10.020
 

Mounted skeleton of Plateosaurus “Fabian” in the Sauriermuseum Frick, with the 20 inch (50 cm) long thigh bone (femur) of a larger Plateosaur as size comparison. Photo: Sauriermuseum Frick, Switzerland
Long neck, small head and a live weight of several tons – with this description you could have tracked down the Plateosaurus in Central Europe about 220 million years ago. For the first time, paleontologists have described an almost complete skeleton of a juvenile Plateosaurus and discovered that it looked very similar to its parents even at a young age.
https://www.uni-bonn.de/news/254-2020?set_language=en

(24.11.2020, USA: 11.24.2020)